Garden Calendar

february

In the garden:

Prune summer-flowering clematis before new shoots appear. Most new clematis should be cut back hard in their first spring. Find a strong pair of leaf buds about a foot above the ground and cut back to just above these. With established plants you can cut back all stems to the lowest pair of healthy buds at about the same height. Read more…

January

In the garden:

Prune roses and wisteria. Roses should be cut back to above a bud, taking out any dead or crossing branches. Cut back summer side growth on wisteria, leaving two or three buds showing.

Bare root roses can be planted.

If you’re storing Dahlia, Begonia and Canna tubers for planting, give them a regular look over to check for rot and dehydration.

Read more…

February

In the garden:

Prune summer-flowering clematis before new shoots appear. Most new clematis should be cut back hard in their first spring. Find a strong pair of leaf buds about a foot above the ground and cut back to just above these. With established plants you can cut back all stems to the lowest pair of healthy buds at about the same height.

You can also prune winter-flowering jasmine, viburnum and cornus.

Read more…

March

In the garden:

Once the soil is frost free and workable, you can add some nutrients in the form of manure (well-rotted), bone meal, Growmore or chicken pellets.

If you do get any snow, knock it off branches and leaves as soon as you see it. The extra weight can easily snap fragile branches.

Roses can be fed with good quality specialist rose feed.

Read more…

April

In the garden:

Feed trees and shrubs with a slow-release fertiliser.

Now’s the time to lift and divide clumps of perennials. Lift gently using a fork, working from the centre out. Some plants can be divided by hand, others will require two forks as levers or even a knife. Consult a good garden guide for the technique for each plant.

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May

In the garden:

If you’ve bought bedding plants from a garden centre you can harden them off now, by introducing them gradually to outside conditions, in the daytime only at first.

As hostas start to produce new growth you can divide them. Lift out the whole clump with a fork and put them carefully on plastic sheeting or a wooden board.

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June

In the garden:

As the final threat of frost passes – in all but the most extreme seasons – plant out your summer bedding plants.

Bluebells and snowdrops can be lifted and the clumps divided to create more plants. Dig well around the plants to keep the bulbs safe. You can take off any remaining flowers to allow the plant to concentrate its energy production into the bulb for next year.

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July

In the garden:

Cut back perennials that have finished flowering.

Hanging baskets and containers should be fed regularly, once a week should be enough. There are specialist feeds for hanging baskets, but a good general fertilizer will also do.

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August

In the garden:

Rhododendrons, azaleas and camellias should be kept well fed with an ericaceous feed. Give plenty of water too.

Dahlias and lilies can be susceptible to wind damage, so keep them well staked with canes or similar supports.

Read more…

September

In the garden:

Start to divide herbaceous perennials, making sure you water the clumps well as you plant them. If you haven’t yet got space or the new plants are small, you can plant them in containers to overwinter in a frost-free place.

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October

In the garden:

Protect half hardy plants with garden fleece as the cold weather is coming.

You can plant up your winter hanging baskets now with pansies, violas, ivy, primulas and so on. Pick hardy plants that will survive frosts outside.

October is the ideal month to moves trees and shrubs. Water them well the day before you move them.

Read more…

November

In the garden:

Bare root roses can be planted anytime from now until March. Dig some organic matter in before you plant if you can and use a fertiliser as a top dressing. Give the roots plenty of room, with a hole about twice the width of the roots. Tease the roots out if they’re compacted. Plant the rose with any graft at or just above the soil.

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December

In the garden:

Check climbers are securely attached to their support structures. Use new ties if needed.

You can start winter pruning Wisteria, cutting back the last season’s new growth to the first two or three buds.

Japanese Maples and vines should be pruned no later than now.

Read more…